Talking with a LISP – A LISP Post

Standard

I first started writing this a couple years ago but the post got shelved and my excitement for LISP faded away….Fortunately for us, LISP is making a bit of a comeback because it is a central component of Cisco’s SD-Access / Campus Fabric solution…and I have some time off during the Xmas holidays!

Locator/ID Separation Protocol (LISP) is a neat solution that aims to decouple the host address from the IP subnet. This is useful for things like vMotioning between data centers since the network can now keep track of hosts as they move across the network. LISP also provides some tunneling through the core so we can reduce the amount of subnets that we need to learn. We’ll also have a look at OTV to help glue things together between the data centers.

Topology

lisp-topology.png

Our topology today is fairly simple aside from the fact I’m using some VMware servers and I’m nesting everything. All the routers are current CSRs, the switches are actually just VMware portgroups, and I’m using VMware Distributed vSwitchs for the convenience since I’m lazy during the holidays ūüôā

VMware

lisp-main-esx.png

To keep the DC LANs separate without messing with my physical setup I have added a VM Host rule for DC1 and DC2 VMs to keep them pinned to different hosts, then I created a standard vswitch without an adapter on each host and created a portgroup that trunks all vlan….it may have been easier to just plug in another switch.

Note: I have configured the vswitches to support jumbo frames for when we get to talking about OTV later.

Routers Config

Core Routers

These are just providing basic routing throughout the network with OSPF or your routing protocol of choice. The MTU is raised everywhere for the OTV configuration between the OTV routers. R03 will be the LISP Map Server (MS) and Map Resolver (MR) as well as the RP when we start adding multicast to the mix so it doesn’t have anything connected to it.

R01

R01(config)#interface Loopback0
R01(config-if)# ip address 192.168.255.1 255.255.255.255
R01(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet2
R01(config-if)# mtu 9216
R01(config-if)# ip address 10.0.123.1 255.255.255.0
R01(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet3
R01(config-if)# mtu 9216
R01(config-if)# ip address 10.50.254.1 255.255.255.0
R01(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet4
R01(config-if)# mtu 9216
R01(config-if)# ip address 10.100.254.1 255.255.255.0
R01(config-if)#router ospf 1
R01(config-router)# network 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 area 0

R02

R02(config)#interface Loopback0
R02(config-if)# ip address 192.168.255.2 255.255.255.255
R02(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet2
R02(config-if)# mtu 9216
R02(config-if)# ip address 10.0.123.2 255.255.255.0
R02(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet3
R02(config-if)# mtu 9216
R02(config-if)# ip address 10.60.254.1 255.255.255.0
R02(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet4
R02(config-if)# mtu 9216
R02(config-if)# ip address 10.200.254.1 255.255.255.0
R02(config-if)#router ospf 1
R02(config-router)# network 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 area 0

R03

R03(config)#interface Loopback0
R03(config-if)# ip address 192.168.255.3 255.255.255.255
R03(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet2
R03(config-if)# mtu 9216
R03(config-if)# ip address 10.0.123.3 255.255.255.0

xTRs

The XTR routers have both the Internal Tunnel Router (ITR) and the Egress Tunnel Router (ETR) LISP roles, they will also have the subinterfaces to connect to the ESX hosts so we have something to ping when we are done.

DC1-XTR

DC1-XTR(config)#interface GigabitEthernet2
DC1-XTR(config-if)# mtu 9216
DC1-XTR(config-if)# ip address 10.100.254.11 255.255.255.0
DC1-XTR(config-if)# ip ospf 1 area 0
DC1-XTR(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet3
DC1-XTR(config-if)# no ip address
DC1-XTR(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet3.10
DC1-XTR(config-subif)# ip address 10.100.10.1 255.255.255.0
DC1-XTR(config-subif)#interface GigabitEthernet3.20
DC1-XTR(config-subif)# ip address 10.100.20.1 255.255.255.0
DC1-XTR(config-subif)#interface GigabitEthernet3.30
DC1-XTR(config-subif)# ip address 10.100.30.1 255.255.255.0
DC1-XTR(config-subif)#interface GigabitEthernet3.123
DC1-XTR(config-subif)# ip address 10.102.123.253 255.255.255.0
DC1-XTR(config-subif)#interface GigabitEthernet3.4094
DC1-XTR(config-subif)# ip address 10.100.255.1 255.255.255.0

DC2-XTR

DC2-XTR(config)# interface GigabitEthernet2
DC2-XTR(config-if)# mtu 9216
DC2-XTR(config-if)# ip address 10.200.254.11 255.255.255.0
DC2-XTR(config-if)# ip ospf 1 area 0
DC2-XTR(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet3
DC2-XTR(config-if)# no ip address
DC2-XTR(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet3.10
DC2-XTR(config-subif)# ip address 10.200.10.1 255.255.255.0
DC2-XTR(config-subif)#interface GigabitEthernet3.20
DC2-XTR(config-subif)# ip address 10.200.20.1 255.255.255.0
DC2-XTR(config-subif)#interface GigabitEthernet3.30
DC2-XTR(config-subif)# ip address 10.200.30.1 255.255.255.0
DC2-XTR(config-subif)#interface GigabitEthernet3.123
DC2-XTR(config-subif)# ip address 10.102.123.254 255.255.255.0
DC2-XTR(config-subif)#interface GigabitEthernet3.4094
DC2-XTR(config-subif)# ip address 10.200.255.1 255.255.255.0

BR1-R01

BR1-R01(config)#interface GigabitEthernet2
BR1-R01(config-if)# mtu 9216
BR1-R01(config-if)# ip address 10.50.254.11 255.255.255.0
BR1-R01(config-if)# ip ospf 1 area 0
BR1-R01(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet3
BR1-R01(config-if)# no ip address
BR1-R01(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet3.10
BR1-R01(config-subif)# ip address 10.50.10.1 255.255.255.0
BR1-R01(config-subif)#interface GigabitEthernet3.20
BR1-R01(config-subif)# ip address 10.50.20.1 255.255.255.0
BR1-R01(config-subif)#interface GigabitEthernet3.30
BR1-R01(config-subif)# ip address 10.50.30.1 255.255.255.0

BR2-R01

BR2-R01(config)#interface GigabitEthernet2
BR2-R01(config-if)# mtu 9216
BR2-R01(config-if)# ip address 10.60.254.11 255.255.255.0
BR2-R01(config-if)# ip ospf 1 area 0
BR2-R01(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet3
BR2-R01(config-if)# no ip address
BR2-R01(config-if)#interface GigabitEthernet3.10
BR2-R01(config-subif)# ip address 10.60.10.1 255.255.255.0
BR2-R01(config-subif)#interface GigabitEthernet3.20
BR2-R01(config-subif)# ip address 10.60.20.1 255.255.255.0
BR2-R01(config-subif)#interface GigabitEthernet3.30
BR2-R01(config-subif)# ip address 10.60.30.1 255.255.255.0

OTV Routers

These routers will be used to run OTV between the DCs so we just need basic routing on it for now.

DC1-OTV

DC1-OTV(config)#interface GigabitEthernet2
DC1-OTV(config-if)# mtu 9216
DC1-OTV(config-if)# ip address 10.100.254.12 255.255.255.0
DC1-OTV(config-if)# ip ospf 1 area 0

DC2-OTV

DC2-OTV(config)#interface GigabitEthernet2
DC2-OTV(config-if)# mtu 9216
DC2-OTV(config-if)# ip address 10.200.254.12 255.255.255.0
DC2-OTV(config-if)# ip ospf 1 area 0

VMs

The VMs are just basic Ubuntu Servers, they have use .100 as their host IP except for DCX-S01 which uses .101, .102, .103 and DCX-S02 which uses .201,.202,.203. This is just to give us more IPs to work with.

LISP Config

R03 is going to be the Map Server and the Map Resolver, while it is possible to have each role on different routers, it is very common to combine the roles. The Map Resolver’s job is to listen for Map-Request messages from the Ingress Tunnel Routers, de-encapsulate them and forward them to the Map-Server role.

The Map-Server listens to the Egress Tunnel Routers and keeps track of the endpoint identifiers (EID) as well as aggregates them.

To configure the router we need to do the following:

  1. Enable LISP with router lisp

  2. Define each site with a EID Prefix and authentication key

  3. Specify what routing table to use with locator-table default

  4. Enable the Map Server and Resolver roles

R03(config)#router lisp
R03(config-router-lisp)# locator-table default
R03(config-router-lisp)# site BRANCH1
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# authentication-key MEOWCAT
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 10.50.0.0/16 accept-more-specifics
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# exit

R03(config-router-lisp)# site BRANCH2
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# authentication-key MEOWCAT
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 10.60.0.0/16 accept-more-specifics
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# exit

R03(config-router-lisp)# site DC1
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# authentication-key MEOWCAT
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 10.100.0.0/16 accept-more-specifics
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# exit

R03(config-router-lisp)# site DC1-DC2
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# authentication-key MEOWCAT
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 10.102.0.0/16 accept-more-specifics
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# exit

R03(config-router-lisp)# site DC2
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# authentication-key MEOWCAT
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 10.200.0.0/16 accept-more-specifics
R03(config-router-lisp-site)# exit

R03(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 map-server
R03(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 map-resolver

Once we are done we can use the show lisp site¬†command to see the status of all the sites, which shouldn’t be all that interesting since we haven’t configured the rest of the sites.

R03(config)#do sh lisp site
LISP Site Registration Information
* = Some locators are down or unreachable
# = Some registrations are sourced by reliable transport

Site Name Last Up Who Last Inst EID Prefix
 Register Registered ID 
BRANCH1 never no -- 10.50.0.0/16
BRANCH2 never no -- 10.60.0.0/16
DC1 never no -- 10.100.0.0/16
DC1-DC2 never no -- 10.102.0.0/16
DC2 never no -- 10.200.0.0/16

XTR

The xTR config is also fairly simple, we just need to do the following:

  1. Enable LISP with router lisp
  2. Specify the ETR interfaces on the router with the locator-set command
  3. Create a EID-Prefix for each subnet on the router we want to advertise with database-mapping
  4. Point the router to R03 for the Map Resolver and Server using the loopback.
DC1-XTR(config)#router lisp
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp)# locator-table default
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp)# locator-set DC1
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp-locator-set)# 10.100.254.11 priority 10 weight 50
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp-locator-set)# exit

DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 10.100.10.0/24 locator-set DC1
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 10.100.20.0/24 locator-set DC1
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 10.100.30.0/24 locator-set DC1

DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr map-resolver 192.168.255.3
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr map-server 192.168.255.3 key MEOWCAT
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp)# exit

Same thing for DC2

DC2-XTR(config)# router lisp
DC2-XTR(config-router-lisp)# locator-table default
DC2-XTR(config-router-lisp)# locator-set DC2
DC2-XTR(config-router-lisp-locator-set)# 10.200.254.11 priority 10 weight 50
DC2-XTR(config-router-lisp-locator-set)# exit

DC2-XTR(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 10.200.10.0/24 locator-set DC2
DC2-XTR(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 10.200.20.0/24 locator-set DC2
DC2-XTR(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 10.200.30.0/24 locator-set DC2

DC2-XTR(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr map-resolver 192.168.255.3
DC2-XTR(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr
DC2-XTR(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr map-server 192.168.255.3 key MEOWCAT
DC2-XTR(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr
DC2-XTR(config-router-lisp)#exit

Once again for Branch1

BR1-R01(config)# router lisp
BR1-R01(config-router-lisp)# locator-set BRANCH1
BR1-R01(config-router-lisp-locator-set)# 10.50.254.11 priority 10 weight 50
BR1-R01(config-router-lisp-locator-set)# exit

BR1-R01(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 10.50.10.0/24 locator-set BRANCH1
BR1-R01(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 10.50.20.0/24 locator-set BRANCH1
BR1-R01(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 10.50.30.0/24 locator-set BRANCH1
BR1-R01(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr map-resolver 192.168.255.3
BR1-R01(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr
BR1-R01(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr map-server 192.168.255.3 key MEOWCAT
BR1-R01(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr
BR1-R01(config-router-lisp)# exit

And finally Branch2

BR2-R01(config)# router lisp
BR2-R01(config-router-lisp)# locator-set BRANCH2
BR2-R01(config-router-lisp-locator-set)# 10.60.254.11 priority 10 weight 50
BR2-R01(config-router-lisp-locator-set)# exit

BR2-R01(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 10.60.10.0/24 locator-set BRANCH2
BR2-R01(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 10.60.20.0/24 locator-set BRANCH2
BR2-R01(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 10.60.30.0/24 locator-set BRANCH2
BR2-R01(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr map-resolver 192.168.255.3
BR2-R01(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr
BR2-R01(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr map-server 192.168.255.3 key MEOWCAT
BR2-R01(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr
BR2-R01(config-router-lisp)# exit

Once we are done with all that we can run our show lisp site¬†command again on R03 to see things registering. We can see that because we used /16’s for each each we can see both the /16 and the more specific subnet for each site.

R03(config)#do sh lisp site
LISP Site Registration Information
* = Some locators are down or unreachable
# = Some registrations are sourced by reliable transport

Site Name Last Up Who Last Inst EID Prefix
 Register Registered ID 
BRANCH1 never no -- 10.50.0.0/16
 00:23:15 yes# 10.50.254.11:40107 10.50.10.0/24
 00:23:15 yes# 10.50.254.11:40107 10.50.20.0/24
 00:23:15 yes# 10.50.254.11:40107 10.50.30.0/24
BRANCH2 never no -- 10.60.0.0/16
 00:23:15 yes# 10.60.254.11:30416 10.60.10.0/24
 00:06:39 yes# 10.60.254.11:30416 10.60.20.0/24
 00:06:37 yes# 10.60.254.11:30416 10.60.30.0/24
DC1 never no -- 10.100.0.0/16
 00:00:19 yes# 10.100.254.11:48560 10.100.10.0/24
 00:00:19 yes# 10.100.254.11:48560 10.100.20.0/24
 00:00:19 yes# 10.100.254.11:48560 10.100.30.0/24
DC1-DC2 never no -- 10.102.0.0/16
DC2 never no -- 10.200.0.0/16
 00:23:13 yes# 10.200.254.11:23411 10.200.10.0/24
 00:23:13 yes# 10.200.254.11:23411 10.200.20.0/24
 00:23:13 yes# 10.200.254.11:23411 10.200.30.0/24

 

If we try to ping from Branch1 we can see that….it doesn’t work ūüôĀ

BR1-R01#ping 10.100.10.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 10.100.10.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
.....
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)

The reason why is that we have only told LISP about the subinterfaces so we will need to source the ping for it to work.

Note: The first ping will take about two pings to work while it first does its registration to the map-server

BR1-R01#ping 10.100.10.1 source g3.10
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 10.100.10.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
Packet sent with a source address of 10.50.10.1 
..!!!
Success rate is 80 percent (4/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/1/2 ms

If we run a packet capture on Branch1 we can see the router sending encapsulated map-requests to the Map-Resolver as well as the replies.

lisp-wireshark01.png

Looking at the actual ping packet we can see that it is encapsulated in UDP 4341 as it is tunneled through the network.

lisp-wireshark02.png

Multicast

For the next segment of this post we’ll need multicast to support LISP mobility and optionally for OTV (though I’m running it in Unicast mode)

Each router will need to have multicast enabled  ip multicast-routing distributed  command and each interface will need to have ip pim sparse on it.

R03 will run BSR so we’ll enable PIM on the loopback and enable the feature.

R03(config)#interface Loopback0
R03(config-if)# ip pim sparse-mode

R03(config-if)#ip pim bsr-candidate Loopback0 0
R03(config)#ip pim rp-candidate Loopback0

OTV

Right now we have inter-site communication working great with LISP but we have a problem with the DCX servers which share the 10.102.123.0/24 subnet so we will need to glue them together so they can talk properly.

OTV is simple enough to configure, first we need to set a site-id for DC1 and DC2 and also define the site bridge-domain. We don’t really care about the site bridge-domain today so I’m just going to set it to 4094.

DC1-OTV(config)#otv site-identifier 0000.0000.1111

DC1-OTV(config)#otv site bridge-domain 4094
DC1-OTV(config-otv-site)#exit
DC2-OTV(config)#otv site-identifier 0000.0000.2222

DC2-OTV(config)#otv site bridge-domain 4094
DC2-OTV(config-otv-site)#exit

Next we need to set service instances to add the bridge-domains that OTV will use.

Note:¬†Service Instances require the config directly on the¬† physical interface so you can’t use a sub-interface based design on the OTV routers.

DC1-OTV(config)#int g3
DC1-OTV(config-if)# service instance 123 ethernet
DC1-OTV(config-if-srv)# encapsulation dot1q 123
DC1-OTV(config-if-srv)# bridge-domain 123
DC1-OTV(config-if-srv)# service instance 4094 ethernet
DC1-OTV(config-if-srv)# encapsulation dot1q 4094
DC1-OTV(config-if-srv)# bridge-domain 4094

DC2-OTV(config)#int g3
DC2-OTV(config-if)# service instance 123 ethernet
DC2-OTV(config-if-srv)# encapsulation dot1q 123
DC2-OTV(config-if-srv)# bridge-domain 123
DC2-OTV(config-if-srv)# service instance 4094 ethernet
DC2-OTV(config-if-srv)# encapsulation dot1q 4094
DC2-OTV(config-if-srv)# bridge-domain 4094

Finally we need to add the Overlay interface to each side. Since we just did multicast a minute ago, lets do unicast for this feature by using the OTV adjacency server.

DC1-OTV(config)#interface Overlay1
DC1-OTV(config-if)# otv join-interface GigabitEthernet2
DC1-OTV(config-if)# otv adjacency-server unicast-only
DC1-OTV(config-if)# service instance 123 ethernet
DC1-OTV(config-if-srv)# encapsulation dot1q 123
DC1-OTV(config-if-srv)# bridge-domain 123
DC1-OTV(config-if-srv)# exit
DC1-OTV(config-if)# no shut
DC2-OTV(config)#interface Overlay1
DC2-OTV(config-if)# otv join-interface GigabitEthernet2
DC2-OTV(config-if)# otv use-adjacency-server 10.100.254.12 unicast-only
DC2-OTV(config-if)# service instance 123 ethernet
DC2-OTV(config-if-srv)# encapsulation dot1q 123
DC2-OTV(config-if-srv)# bridge-domain 123
DC2-OTV(config-if-srv)#exit
DC2-OTV(config-if)#no shut

Once OTV comes up and some traffic happens you will be able to see the OTV routes being learned.

DC1-OTV#show otv route

Codes: BD - Bridge-Domain, AD - Admin-Distance,
 SI - Service Instance, * - Backup Route

OTV Unicast MAC Routing Table for Overlay1

Inst VLAN BD MAC Address AD Owner Next Hops(s)
----------------------------------------------------------
 0 123 123 0000.0c07.ac7b 40 BD Eng Gi3:SI123
*0 123 123 0000.0c07.ac7b 50 ISIS DC2-OTV
 0 123 123 0050.569d.1e76 40 BD Eng Gi3:SI123
 0 123 123 0050.569d.8001 50 ISIS DC2-OTV

4 unicast routes displayed in Overlay1

----------------------------------------------------------
4 Total Unicast Routes Displayed

Now we will setup HSRP on the 123 subinterface so each side can use .1 as the default gateway

DC1-XTR(config)#interface GigabitEthernet3.123
DC1-XTR(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1Q 123
DC1-XTR(config-subif)# ip address 10.102.123.253 255.255.255.0
DC1-XTR(config-subif)# standby 123 ip 10.102.123.1
DC1-XTR(config-subif)# standby 123 priority 110
DC1-XTR(config-subif)# standby 123 preempt

Note:¬†OTV will filter HSRP messages by default with the otv filter-fhrp¬†command so it isn’t necessary to do things like preempt since both sides will be active, but old habits die hard and it gives me a reason to talk about the fact that FHRP is filtered!

LISP Mobility

Now we have LISP and a slick L2VPN setup, what else do we need? Well we have a bit of a communication problem since we have IPs in the 10.102.123.0/24 that can be in DC1 and DC2, we can add another EID-Prefix but we will end up forcing traffic from a branch through the OTV if it is misrouted. Instead we can use the LISP Mobility feature to allow for more intelligent routing.

To do this we use the dynamic-eid, the process is similar except we can name it and we need to specify a multicast address so the XTR can notify the map server when hosts relocate.

DC1-XTR(config)#router lisp
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp)# dynamic-eid SERVERS
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp-dynamic-eid)# database-mapping 10.102.123.0/24 locator-set DC1
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp-dynamic-eid)# map-server 192.168.255.3 key MEOWCAT
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp-dynamic-eid)# map-notify-group 239.123.0.12
DC1-XTR(config-router-lisp-dynamic-eid)# exit

For our hard work we now get a local /32 route for each mobile host on the XTR, this solves the routing issue that OTV caused by ensuring that traffic is only sent across the OTV if the host isn’t local.

DC1-XTR#show ip route lisp
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
 D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area 
 N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
 i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
 ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
 o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
 a - application route
 + - replicated route, % - next hop override, p - overrides from PfR

Gateway of last resort is not set

10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 19 subnets, 2 masks
l 10.102.123.101/32 
 [10/1] via 10.102.123.101, 00:01:51, GigabitEthernet3.123
l 10.102.123.102/32 
 [10/1] via 10.102.123.102, 00:00:57, GigabitEthernet3.123
l 10.102.123.103/32 
 [10/1] via 10.102.123.103, 00:00:16, GigabitEthernet3.123

Now if we migrate the VM we should see at least the 10.102.123.101 route move to DC2-XTR

lisp-esx-migration.png

DC2-XTR(config-subif)# do sh ip route lisp | be Gateway
Gateway of last resort is not set

10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 21 subnets, 2 masks
l 10.102.123.101/32 
 [10/1] via 10.102.123.101, 00:02:24, GigabitEthernet3.123
l 10.102.123.102/32 
 [10/1] via 10.102.123.102, 00:00:01, GigabitEthernet3.123
l 10.102.123.201/32 
 [10/1] via 10.102.123.201, 01:15:11, GigabitEthernet3.123
l 10.102.123.202/32 
 [10/1] via 10.102.123.202, 00:01:02, GigabitEthernet3.123
l 10.102.123.203/32 
 [10/1] via 10.102.123.203, 00:01:02, GigabitEthernet3.123

Cool!!!

Conclusion

That’s all for me today, hopefully you found this interesting. I’ll probably look more into the Campus Fabric solution which pairs LISP with VXLAN and TrustSec which sounds like plenty of fun!

 

 

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